‘The Bachelor’ sets low standards for entertainment

By Kate Muska
February 4, 2015

Creative Commons
Chris Soules or “Prince Farming” claims to want to find love and a bride to take home to Iowa.
Creative Commons Chris Soules or “Prince Farming” claims to want to find love and a bride to take home to Iowa.

“The Bachelor’” has been airing on  ABC for 19 seasons since 2002, showing typically two seasons a year. Filmed around the world, in places such as the United States, Canada, England and New Zealand, the series is based around one bachelor in search of his true love. The bachelor spends his time doing various activities getting to know 25 women, one of whom he is expected to propose to in the end. Through these activities, the bachelor gradually eliminates candidates. At the end of an episode, the bachelor will give out roses. Those who do not receive roses are eliminated, and the show continues until there are two women left. The final two women go on to meet the bachelor’s family. At the end of the episode, the bachelor proposes to one woman by presenting the final rose. However, it has become fairly normal for the man to pursue a relationship with his choice rather than proposing.

As far as reality television goes, “The Bachelor” is one of the most shallow, ridiculous shows out there. It’s hard to tell which is worse: the arrogant man who expects two dozen women to fawn and fight over him, or the two dozen catty women who are willing to compete for the affection of a man they don’t even know. It is hard to have respect for a man who is perfectly content with watching females cry, fight and spend all of their precious energy on him, when the only thing he has to worry about is which one he’ll make-out with next.

At the same time, it’s difficult to comprehend why a woman would want to fight for a man’s attention. Love is not something to be earned; it is something to be given and received truly and honestly. A woman that is willingly to find a potential life partner who is busy getting to know his other options at the same time is baffling. That is not to mention the fact that this is all aired on public television.

The women on this show—as well as the man—reach their lowest when there are only three contestants left. At this point, the bachelor offers keys to the master suite to each of the women, who get to spend one night with him alone, without cameras. Basically, when it starts to get really tough to decide who he wants, the bachelor chalks it up to who is best in bed. After these nights are spent, the bachelor eliminates a woman. His second to last decision is based off of sex. ‘The Bachelor” portrays sex as the ultimate act of true love, but of course that can’t be true, since after the single man sleeps with his final three choices, he easily sends one of them away.

After all of that, what does the series have to show for it? According to a VH1 article, out of both “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette,” there have been 17 proposals, but only three marriages and six “happy endings,” meaning the couples are still together today. With those numbers, it’s safe to say that this is not a show about finding true love, but yet another dignity-lacking reality show meant solely for audience entertainment.

Creative Commons The contestants, dressed up in evening gowns and tired after vying for Chris’ attention, pose .
Creative Commons
The contestants, dressed up in evening gowns and tired after vying for Chris’ attention, pose .

 

 

Creative Commons Chris Soules or “Prince Farming” claims to want to find love and a bride to take home to Iowa.
Creative Commons
Chris Soules or “Prince Farming” claims to want to find love and a bride to take home to Iowa.
Creative Commons Who will receive a rose on "The Bachelor?"
Creative Commons
Who will receive a rose on “The Bachelor?”

Kate Muska

A sophomore communications major with a minor in English, Katie is very dedicated to her writing. Katie is an assistant editor to the Lifestyles section of the Loquitur and is looking to go into the field of publishing.

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