Styles of testing vary among teachers

By Shane Evans
October 14, 2005

Jerry Zurek

Projects and Presentations

We are given one of about three or four ways in which to get those good grades we all strive for. We have the tests and quizzes and then the projects and presentations.

The argument is made about which type of work, test or quizzes or projects and presentations, has a bigger impact on how we learn as students. Which genre, if you will, ultimately will present us students with the best chance to succeed. In my esteemed opinion, I feel as though the answer is clear as day.

Just think about it this way. What would you rather do? Cram for a week for a test where you know once you are done taking it, for many of us failing it, and realizing afterwards you got nothing out of it, except giving your professor another reason to scorn you. On the other hand, you can work on a project or paper over a few weeks and put some hard work into it and have something tangible at it’s conclusion that you can proudly call your own.

I think the choice is pretty simple.

When it comes right down to it, people will learn more from research and the creation of something that is their own. There is barely anything to gain from forcing yourself to remember a bunch of answers for a math test or writing an on-the-spot essay about a topic you don’t understand.

Knowledge comes from reviewing the material in a stress-free environment, where there are no limits as to how long or when you must complete the work by.

The thing about tests is that the environment is so forced. When you have to sit down and extract all those facts from your brain, with no reference, it sometimes will adversely affect how well you do. That kind of pressure is something only a select few can respond well too. Yeah, we are getting older now, and have taken a million tests in our day, but when you stop and think about it: How much have they actually helped?

In my personal experience, I have never once learned something from a test. Granted, they are supposed to be a review of what we already know, but in my eyes, their only purpose is to give teachers some concrete to base a usually huge portion of our grade off of.

Now, on the much better, more productive and efficient, other hand, we have the marvels that are projects and presentations. Yes, these are very general words, but meaningful nonetheless.

It’s common sense that when someone has time to prepare and work hard at something, they will obviously do much better and take more from the experience. When you do a presentation, its obvious that you’ll want it to be good because in most cases, you’ll have to present in front of the class. And no one wants to be embarrassed, especially in front of his or her peers.

With papers, it’s pretty much the same thing, but on a more personal basis. I know with me, I never turn in a paper that I feel doesn’t reflect my level as a writer. I feel as though I am cheating myself when I do. In an essay test or whatever the case may be, that attitude is changed, because you have no choice but to write hastily and there is no time for correction.

We pay a lot for the education we get here at Cabrini, and the majority of us want to make the most of it. With that said, I hold fast in my opinion about which way to learn is better and whoever disagrees might just have to write a counterpoint to it. But for those of you who care about their education, you know the right way to go.

Tests and Quizzes
by Lauren Sharkey

We are given one of about three or four ways in which to get those good grades we all strive for. We have the tests and quizzes and then the projects and presentations.

The argument is made about which type of work, test or quizzes or projects and presentations, has a bigger impact on how we learn as students. Which genre, if you will, ultimately will present us students with the best chance to succeed. In my esteemed opinion, I feel as though the answer is clear as day.

Just think about it this way. What would you rather do? Cram for a week for a test where you know once you are done taking it, for many of us failing it, and realizing afterwards you got nothing out of it, except giving your professor another reason to scorn you. On the other hand, you can work on a project or paper over a few weeks and put some hard work into it and have something tangible at it’s conclusion that you can proudly call your own.

I think the choice is pretty simple.

When it comes right down to it, people will learn more from research and the creation of something that is their own. There is barely anything to gain from forcing yourself to remember a bunch of answers for a math test or writing an on-the-spot essay about a topic you don’t understand.

Knowledge comes from reviewing the material in a stress-free environment, where there are no limits as to how long or when you must complete the work by.

The thing about tests is that the environment is so forced. When you have to sit down and extract all those facts from your brain, with no reference, it sometimes will adversely affect how well you do. That kind of pressure is something only a select few can respond well too. Yeah, we are getting older now, and have taken a million tests in our day, but when you stop and think about it: How much have they actually helped?

In my personal experience, I have never once learned something from a test. Granted, they are supposed to be a review of what we already know, but in my eyes, their only purpose is to give teachers some concrete to base a usually huge portion of our grade off of.

Now, on the much better, more productive and efficient, other hand, we have the marvels that are projects and presentations. Yes, these are very general words, but meaningful nonetheless.

It’s common sense that when someone has time to prepare and work hard at something, they will obviously do much better and take more from the experience. When you do a presentation, its obvious that you’ll want it to be good because in most cases, you’ll have to present in front of the class. And no one wants to be embarrassed, especially in front of his or her peers.

With papers, it’s pretty much the same thing, but on a more personal basis. I know with me, I never turn in a paper that I feel doesn’t reflect my level as a writer. I feel as though I am cheating myself when I do. In an essay test or whatever the case may be, that attitude is changed, because you have no choice but to write hastily and there is no time for correction.

We pay a lot for the education we get here at Cabrini, and the majority of us want to make the most of it. With that said, I hold fast in my opinion about which way to learn is better and whoever disagrees might just have to write a counterpoint to it. But for those of you who care about their education, you know the right way to go.

Posted to the web by Brandon Edwards

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Shane Evans

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