College costs surmount inflation rates

By Jason Radka
December 1, 2006

Brenda K. Colwell

The cost of going to college, including Cabrini, has gone up this past year faster than national inflation, which is the bad news recently reported by the College Board. The positive news is that it has gone up at a slower rate than in the past.

Recently, the College Board released new data saying that costs at four-year private colleges went up two percent more than inflation.

In 2005 the national inflation rate was around 3.2 percent, and the college tuition, including fees at four-year colleges, went up by 5.9 percent, more than 2 percent over inflation.

Inflation is the average price increase over the course of a year. For example, if the average price for a can of soup, a bicycle and a ticket to a football game has increased by three percent over a year, then three percent is the inflation rate for the year.

The average total of tuition, fees, room and board at private colleges is $30,367. Total student aid has gone up by 3.7 percent, which is better than inflation, but federal aid has not gone up equal to inflation.

Students are in awe when they see these numbers. Lauren Beck, sophomore finance major said, “Well, in some aspects it is unfair to the students because in retrospect, it costs more now to go to school than in decades before.”

However, the rise in tuition helps faculty and staff in schools nation wide. Beck also said, “But for the faculty, the rises in tuition are needed to sustain their daily lives. I think that education costs should not be raised every single year, but maybe every other year. every year raise is a problem”

A federal grant is the money that the government gives college students to help pay college tuition. However, the federal government is not upping the amount they give each year to keep up with the inflation number. In addition, each year, in their jobs people are supposed to get raises that at least keep up with the inflation rate at a minimum.

Some students are concerned with the education they are paying for. Cristina D’Amelio, a senior psychology major, said, “From what I understand about college costs, we are overpaying for the amount of education we are getting. We should be able to get a higher education at a more affordable price to make us better qualified for better jobs.”

College students have a problem with where the government has been unloading their funds and have strong opinions on where the more important places should be. Ryan Kirby, a junior English and communication major, said, “I don’t know if there is an easy answer, but I think the government needs to reevaluate the budget and realize that spending billions of dollars a week in Iraq is not as necessary as they would have us think.” Kirby also said, “Some of that money could be used in several areas and college tuition reimbursement should definitely be one of them.”

According to a collegeboard.com press release, “published tuition and fee charges at four-year private colleges average $22,218 in 2006-07. The $1,238 increase over 2005-06 represents an increase of 5.9 percent, or 2 percent after adjusting for inflation. The average total tuition, fee, room, and board charges at private four-year colleges and universities are $30,367.” Cabrini College falls under this category.

Kirby ended with, “I think it’s a hard situation because even since I’ve been at Cabrini, I know how high the tuition price has risen and it puts pressure on the students and parents to have enough money in scholarships and aid to soften the blow.”

Loquitur welcomes your comments and questions on this story. Please send your comments to: Loquitur@googlegroups.com. The editors will review your comments each week and make corrections if warranted.

The cost of going to college, including Cabrini, has gone up this past year faster than national inflation, which is the bad news recently reported by the College Board. The positive news is that it has gone up at a slower rate than in the past.

Recently, the College Board released new data saying that costs at four-year private colleges went up two percent more than inflation.

In 2005 the national inflation rate was around 3.2 percent, and the college tuition, including fees at four-year colleges, went up by 5.9 percent, more than 2 percent over inflation.

Inflation is the average price increase over the course of a year. For example, if the average price for a can of soup, a bicycle and a ticket to a football game has increased by three percent over a year, then three percent is the inflation rate for the year.

The average total of tuition, fees, room and board at private colleges is $30,367. Total student aid has gone up by 3.7 percent, which is better than inflation, but federal aid has not gone up equal to inflation.

Students are in awe when they see these numbers. Lauren Beck, sophomore finance major said, “Well, in some aspects it is unfair to the students because in retrospect, it costs more now to go to school than in decades before.”

However, the rise in tuition helps faculty and staff in schools nation wide. Beck also said, “But for the faculty, the rises in tuition are needed to sustain their daily lives. I think that education costs should not be raised every single year, but maybe every other year. every year raise is a problem”

A federal grant is the money that the government gives college students to help pay college tuition. However, the federal government is not upping the amount they give each year to keep up with the inflation number. In addition, each year, in their jobs people are supposed to get raises that at least keep up with the inflation rate at a minimum.

Some students are concerned with the education they are paying for. Cristina D’Amelio, a senior psychology major, said, “From what I understand about college costs, we are overpaying for the amount of education we are getting. We should be able to get a higher education at a more affordable price to make us better qualified for better jobs.”

College students have a problem with where the government has been unloading their funds and have strong opinions on where the more important places should be. Ryan Kirby, a junior English and communication major, said, “I don’t know if there is an easy answer, but I think the government needs to reevaluate the budget and realize that spending billions of dollars a week in Iraq is not as necessary as they would have us think.” Kirby also said, “Some of that money could be used in several areas and college tuition reimbursement should definitely be one of them.”

According to a collegeboard.com press release, “published tuition and fee charges at four-year private colleges average $22,218 in 2006-07. The $1,238 increase over 2005-06 represents an increase of 5.9 percent, or 2 percent after adjusting for inflation. The average total tuition, fee, room, and board charges at private four-year colleges and universities are $30,367.” Cabrini College falls under this category.

Kirby ended with, “I think it’s a hard situation because even since I’ve been at Cabrini, I know how high the tuition price has risen and it puts pressure on the students and parents to have enough money in scholarships and aid to soften the blow.”

Loquitur welcomes your comments and questions on this story. Please send your comments to: Loquitur@googlegroups.com. The editors will review your comments each week and make corrections if warranted.

Jason Radka

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